A fine, provincial, mid- 18th century, walnut chest-on-chest

September 18, 2019 2:37 pm Published by

In two parts. The top with a moulded edge above a cavetto cornice, with canted corners. The top section with three short drawers above three long drawers, all feather and cross-banded, faced with ovolo mouldings, and with original handles, escutcheons and replaced locks. The canted sides decorated with flutings elegantly tapering to a point at the bottom. The sides veneered in oak. The bottom section with three long, feather and crossbanded drawers, faced with ovolo mouldings and with original handles, escutcheons and replaced locks. The sides in solid oak. Standing on pine bracket feet with repairs to lower part. Minor repairs to veneers and ovolo mouldings. The carcass oak and pine, some drawers re-run. Exceptional original configuration, colour and patina. Probably English, second quarter of the 18th century. 5127971.

The colour and patina of this fine piece of provincial walnut, have matured over time to an exceptional quality that rarely survives today. The tactile surface retains much of its original varnishes around the handles, escutcheons and drawer edges creating a wonderful intensity of colour and patina which graduates to a mellow-depth where the main force of the duster has been applied over the years. It is relatively rare to find utalitarian pieces of furniture of this age retaining their original brassware, and this is a fine, feature to possess. Finally, the proportion of this piece is well executed, displaying harmony and balance throughout.

Double chests of drawers were introduced around 1700, as the design evolved and drawers replaced turned supports in the lower section. They were generally surmounted by a straight, hollow cornice, with the canted corners decorated with fluting. The ovolo mouldings, used to face the drawers indicate that this piece was most likely to have been made between 1725 and 1735. The selection and matching of the veneers showed the degree of care lavished on furniture during this period. Such pieces remained popular until mid-Georgian designers introduced other varieties of bedroom furniture.

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This post was written by joecollinson